Heat Wave Safety: Information On Excessive Heat Warning, Excessive Heat Watches & Heat Advisory, Plus Heat Cramps, Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke

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How to Stay Cool in Extreme Heat

Let’s start with a video from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): How to Stay Cool in Extreme Heat
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Here are the National Weather Service Levels for heat Excessive Heat Warning, Excessive Heat Watches & Heat Advisory

heat map

Excessive Heat Warning – Take Action! An Excessive Heat Warning is issued within 12 hours of the onset of extremely dangerous heat conditions. The general rule of thumb for this Warning is when the maximum heat index temperature is expected to be 105° or higher for at least 2 days and night time air temperatures will not drop below 75°; however, these criteria vary across the country, especially for areas not used to extreme heat conditions. If you don’t take precautions immediately when conditions are extreme, you become seriously illness or even die.

Excessive Heat Watches – Be Prepared! Heat watches are issued when conditions are favorable for an excessive heat event in the next 24 to 72 hours. A Watch is used when the risk of a heat wave has increased but its occurrence and timing is still uncertain.

Heat Advisory – Take Action! A Heat Advisory is issued within 12 hours of the onset of extremely dangerous heat conditions. The general rule of thumb for this Advisory is when the maximum heat index temperature is expected to be 100° or higher for at least 2 days, and night time air temperatures will not drop below 75°; however, these criteria vary across the country, especially for areas that are not used to dangerous heat conditions. Take precautions to avoid heat illness. If you don’t take precautions, you could become seriously illness or even die.

Heat Index Chart

heat index chart
Heat Cramps, Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke

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Heat Cramps

Heat Cramps Symptoms: Heat cramps may be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or stroke. Painful muscle cramps and spasms usually in legs and abdomen, Heavy sweating

Heat Cramps First Aid: Apply firm pressure on cramping muscles or gently massage to relieve spasm. Give sips of water unless the person complains of nausea, then stop giving water

Heat Exhaustion

Heat Exhaustion Symptoms: Heavy sweating, Weakness, Cool, pale, clammy skin, Fast, weak pulse, Possible muscle cramps, Dizziness, Nausea or vomiting, Fainting
Heat Exhaustion First Aid: Move person to a cooler environment, Lay person down and loosen clothing, Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of the body as possible, Fan or move victim to air conditioned room, Offer sips of water, If person vomits more than once, seek immediate medical attention.

Heat Stroke

Heat Stroke Symptoms: Altered mental state, One or more of the following symptoms: throbbing headache, confusion, nausea, dizziness, shallow breathing, Body temperature above 103°F
Hot, red, dry or moist skin, Rapid and strong pulse, Faints, loses consciousness
Heat Stroke First Aid: Heat stroke is a severe medical emergency. Call 911 or get the victim to a hospital immediately. Delay can be fatal. Move the victim to a cooler, preferably air-conditioned, environment.
Reduce body temperature with cool cloths or bath. Use fan if heat index temperatures are below the high 90s. A fan can make you hotter at higher temperatures. Do NOT give fluids.

 

 

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